How You Answer This Simple Question Should Determine How You Vote in the 2022 Midterm Elections

As voters head to the polls in just under three weeks they must ask themselves a famous question. This question is probably the most famous phrase ever spoken during a presidential debate: “Are you better off today than you were (two) four years ago?”

That question was asked by Ronald Regan to President Carter in 1980, and the response was a clear —  NO!

Fast forward to 2022. Ask yourself the same questions Reagan asked but shorten the time frame to two years. Are you better off today than you were two years ago? Let’s take a look.

By every conceivable metric things are more expensive, from fuel to utility bills to groceries. The average American family is struggling to fuel their vehicles and feed their families.

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Inflation grew for the second month in September with prices rising faster than expected. Consumer price index data showed inflation rose 0.4% in September and 8.2% over the past year. That’s never good for a party that controls the White House, U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.

And, while it’s true fuel prices have fallen from historic highs of over $5 per gallon. AAA says the average gas price in the U.S. is $3.84 today, October 20, up 20 cents from last month. When Biden took office on January 20, 2021, the national average was $2.39. That is an increase of $1.45 per gallon, an increase of 63% since Biden took office.

And, grocery prices are continuing to climb. A pound of beef costs 25% more today than when Joe Biden took office, and a dozen eggs costs a whopping 113% more.

We are all feeling the squeeze when we go shopping or try and fill up our vehicle, and an angry voter is apassionate voter. Often people go to polls because they want a change, and most likely very true for this midterm election.

Status quo is very rarely the successful message to run on for elected officials.

In recent survey data, Republicans hold a 49-45 lead over Democrats in the generic ballot with just weeks to go. Only a month ago, the same survey found the Democrats had a one-point lead in the generic, indicating a swing of 6 points in favor of the GOP.

Historical precedent is also against Joe Biden and the Democrat party. The party of the incumbent president has only gained seats in congress in a mid-term election twice in the past 75 years. To be precise, in the 19 midterm elections between 1946 and 2018, the president’s party has improved upon its share of the House popular vote just once.

Although the president’s party almost always loses seats in the House in a midterm, the pattern is a bit more inconsistent in the Senate. Since World War II, the president’s party had either gained seats on net or at least avoided losing ground in 6 out of 19 midterm elections.

And, it has never happened with an economy in free fall, where experts believe we are headed towards a certain recession.

It seems that the Democrats want to talk about the Roe v. Wade decision and former President Donald Trump. Those two issues are not even in the top five things polls show that are concerning Americans. “It’s the economy stupid.” And because people vote with their wallets, the Democrats may well get crushed this November. 

Voters will likely ask themselves in the sanctity of the ballot box, do we want “change vs. more of the same.”

Change is in the air, the polling data tells us that, our 401K’s tell us that, fuel cost, utility and grocery bills tell us that, also.

I’m keeping my fingers crossed that Republicans prevail and take back the House and Senate and save America.

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