CDC Study Finds 78% of People Hospitalized with Covid-19 Were Overweight or Obese

The CDC has came out with new numbers that show that 78% of those who were hospitalized with Covid-19 were overweight or obese, a number that again shows that eating healthy, working out, and taking supplements can go a long way in hampering the effects of the virus.

Among 148,494 adults who received a Covid-19 diagnosis during an emergency department or inpatient visit, 238 U.S. hospitals from March to December, 71,491 were hospitalized. Of those admitted, 27.% were overweight and 50.2% were obese, according to the CDC report.

Overweight is defined by having a BMI of 25 or more, while obesity is having a BMI of 30 or more.

The agency found the risk for hospitalizations, ICU admissions and deaths was lowest among individuals with BMIs under 25. The risk of severe illness “sharply increased,” however, as BMIs rose, particularly among people 65 and older, the agency said.

Just over 42% of the U.S. population was considered obese in 2018, according to the agency’s most recent statistics.

It doesn’t take a lot of extra pounds to be considered overweight or obese. A 5-foot-10-inch man at 175 pounds and 5-foot-4-inch woman at 146 pounds would both be considered overweight with BMIs of just over 25, according to the CDC’s BMI calculator. A man and woman of the same heights would be considered obese at 210 pounds and 175 pounds, respectively.

“As clinicians develop care plans for COVID-19 patients, they should consider the risk for severe outcomes in patients with higher BMIs, especially for those with severe obesity,” the agency wrote.

  • About 78% of people who have been hospitalized, needed a ventilator or died from Covid-19 have been overweight or obese, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a new study Monday.
  • Just over 42% of the U.S. population was considered obese in 2018, according to the agency’s most recent statistics. Overweight is defined as having a body mass index of 25 or more, while obesity is defined as having a BMI of 30 or more.
  • “As clinicians develop care plans for COVID-19 patients, they should consider the risk for severe outcomes in patients with higher BMIs, especially for those with severe obesity,” the CDC wrote.

You can read more from our friends at CNBC.

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